Category Archives: Food

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Southland: UVO

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Sun protection for golfers and others on the golf course can be a messy proposition.

Sunscreen that’s good for your health isn’t always so good for your golf grips and shirts. Laguna Beach dermatologist Dr. Bobby Awadalla has a cleaner alternative – UVO, a sun-protection supplement you drink.

This year, UVO has been available at a few Orange County courses, but Awadalla is hoping the product will be more widely available, and possibly national, a year from now.

The product is more prominent in the beach- and ocean-sport communities right now, but Awadalla says UVO is just as much a fit for golf.

“Golf is very right for this product,” he said. “The normal round takes between 3-5 hours, and golfers don’t like to get sunscreen on their hands and gloves so they can drink UVO to provide supplemental protection for the entirety of their game. Golf is an ideal sport for it.”

Monarch Beach Golf Links, Tijeras Creek and Marbella Country Club are some of the courses where the product has been available thus far. The product is best served chilled, so it’s been hosted on beverage carts and snack areas rather than in the pro shop.

The flavor is billed as Orange Peach, but it tastes more like a tangerine-flavored Gatorade.

The idea for a supplement solution for sun protection came to Awadalla after years of seeing people with preventable skin cancer pass through his office due to inconsistent, or lack of, use of sunscreen.

“It just boggled by mind that this was still happening,” he said. “I did some research of the use of topical medicine to treat skin conditions, include psoriasis. I found that people didn’t use it very consistently, even if they had skin disease.

“I thought, maybe we need to rethink this. What we do every day is drink and eat, regardless of what’s happening in our lives, and there’s a lot of evidence that shows vitamins, anti-inflammatories and phytonutrients protect us from the sun.

“After five years of formulation, I came up with scientifically based formula to provide skin protection, and that’s now UVO.”

In essence, Awadalla said, a sun burn is an inflammation, something the body’s immune system can fight. UVO’s special formula bolsters that ability.

In its first test among 15 people, Awadalla said UVO proved to increase sun protection, measured in the amount of UV radiation required to burn, by 40 percent 30 minutes after consumption. Then came a positive result Awadalla hadn’t expected.

“We discovered UVO worked retroactively to stop a burn from happening and worked to heal the burn, so it works proactively and retroactively,” he said.

That made UVO a much more versatile and beneficial product than Awadalla ever expected and give it a major differentiator for sunscreen.

“You can compare sunscreen and UVO this way: Sunscreen does one thing well; UVO does many things well,” he said. “It also stops DNA damage, collagen damage and protects and repairs cell membranes. It also stops free radicals.”

While the drink has many benefits, it also has limits. For instance, it can’t match the maximum protection of a sunscreen.

“UVO will probably never get to the level of a 50 SPF, but even an SPF 5 provides 80 percent UV blockage so having baseline protection makes a difference,” he said. “Overall most people who drink UVO should have a good experience and will receive different levels of protection from it. We encourage people to be conservative in the trial phase while finding out exactly how it works for them.

“We all have different skin types and we all absorb and utilize supplements differently, so there will be variation. That’s why we say 3-5 hours of protection on the bottle.”

You can find more information about UVO, including an FAQ, at drinkuvo.com.

UVO

A Q &A With Dr. Bobby Awadalla, Inventor Of UVO

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It’s sun protection in a bottle, but it isn’t sunscreen – it’s a supplement that you drink.

In short, that’s UVO, the new approach to skin protection developed by Laguna Beach dermatologist Bobby Awadalla. The nutrients and other elements in the 30 ingredients that comprise UVO naturally bolster the immune system to provide 3-5 to hours of supplemental sun protection.

After five years of developing the formula, Dr. Awadalla finally released the product this year. It has found regional success that he’s hoping will be national in the near future.

Dr. Awadalla recently look a few minutes to talk about UVO’s development and share some of its success. I will disclose up front that a golf playing partner and I took UVO before a recent round on an 80-85 degree day, didn’t use sunblock, and a suffered no ill effects.

The formula is promoted as Orange Peach, but it tasted more like a tangerine to me. It’s like Gatorade to drink and can be served warm or chilled. As for a taste, I’ll just say that I like it better than my protein shake.
Here’s my interview with Dr. Awadalla.

How did the idea for the product occur to you, and how did you end up looking for the answer on the supplement side?

It began with my frustration over seeing severely sun-damaged people who had skin cancer due to their lack of application of sunscreen. It just boggled by mind that this was still happening.

I did some research of the use of topical medicine to treat skin conditions, include psoriasis. I found that people didn’t use it very consistently, even if they had skin disease.

I thought, maybe we need to rethink this.

What we do every day is drink and eat, regardless of what’s happening in our lives, and there’s a lot of evidence that shows vitamins, anti-inflammatories and phytonutrients protect us from the sun.

After five years of formulation, I came up with good formula to provide skin protection, and that’s now UVO.

What’s the biggest challenge to getting people to use or accept UVO?

The difficult part is educating people who think you can only apply something to your skin to protect you from the sun. This is a new concept and that’s why education is part of the promotion.

How and when did you know UVO worked?

I was comfortable with the science right away because I knew all the time and effort that went into creating it, but it wasn’t until we tested 15 people that we had the studies to prove it.

We tested about 15 people and the studies showed that within 30 minutes you had a 40 percent increase in the amount of UV radiation required to burn. Then we discovered something by accident: UVO worked retroactively to stop a burn from happening and worked to heal the burn, so it works proactively and retroactively.

Burns are mostly an inflammation. The anti-inflammatories in UVO help stop the inflammatory process and soothe the symptoms of sunburn.

Wow. Sunscreen can’t do that.

No. It also has other functions that make it a very versatile product. It stops DNA damage, collagen damage and protects and repairs cell membranes. It also stops free radicles.

You can compare sunscreen and UVO this way: Sunscreen does one thing well; UVO does many things well.

What SPF is UVO the equivalent of? Is the protection the same for everyone or does it vary?

We all have different skin types and we all absorb and utilize supplements differently, so there will be variation. That’s why we say 3-5 hours of protection on the bottle.

UVO will probably never get to the level of a 50 SPF, but even an SPF 5 provides 80 percent UV blockage so having baseline protection makes a difference. Overall most people who drink UVO should have a good experience and experience different levels of protection from it. We encourage people to be conservative in the trial phase while finding out exactly how it works for them.

What groups or demographics have most readily adapted UVO?

We have found that health conscious individuals who live an active outdoor lifestyle love our product. We already have a good following in the skim boarding and beach volleyball communities. We’re just breaking in with the surfers. Beach/water and outdoors sports are huge for us, and we’re already got a following.

We’d really like to see swimmers, paddle boarders – especially stand-up paddle boarders – using it.

Besides your web site – www.drinkuvo.com – where can people expect to find the product at retail?

We want to be distributed within the natural food channels, so Whole Foods, Mother’s Market, Sprouts, Gelson’s Market, places like that.

We want to be in pharmacies, so the sun-protection section of CVS, Walgreens, we’d like to be there as well as surf shops, cycle shops and at golf and tennis clubs. We’re already at some of those places, and are looking to expand further in the near term.

How do you see UVO as a fit with golf?

Golf is very right for this product. The normal round takes between 3-5 hours, and golfers don’t like to get sunscreen on their hands / gloves so they can drink UVO to provide supplemental protection for the entirety of their game. Golf is an ideal sport for it.

What are your hopes for growth and use of the product over the next year?

A year from now, I’d like to see the product be national, beyond just being on our web site and around Laguna Beach. We’re spending the next few months really trying to establish ourselves regionally in SoCal. But we definitely want to be national by next summer.

You can find more info. about UVO and the recommended use if it in an FAQ at the UVO web site: drinkuvo.com/faqs/

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Sushi

Video Post: Sushi Made By A Master At Pechanga

During at stay at Pechanga Casino in July, I had the pleasure of meeting Chef Kiyokuni Ikeda, the new head chef at Umi Sushi and Oyster bar.

He graciously agreed to let an amateur videographer study him at work while he made an umi roll, which consists of albacore, tempura shrimp, crab, jalapeno and spicy aioli. The results were, naturally, delicious.

The following videos allow you to study a master at is craft.

You can find all the menu offerings at Umi at www.pechanga.com.

Coasterra

Maderas: Introducing Coasterra

Coasterra

Coasterra, San Diego’s hottest new restaurant concept, launched this week with a private party and is set to open mid-August on Harbor Island.

Coasterra offers a modern Mexican-themed menu and impeccable views of San Diego from across the harbor. A wrap-around patio offers dining ambiance unlike anywhere else in the city. It was nine years in the marking, but chef Deborah Scott and Cohen Restaurant group got it right. What an exciting new addition the local restaurant scene and wonderful complement to adjacent Island Prime.

Welcome to San Diego, on behalf of your partners at Sunroad Enterprises and Troon Golf. We look forward to dining with you very soon.

Here’s a look at Coasterra:

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wine

interior

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Creamed corn

bathroom

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The evening’s entertainment – the Electric Angels

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JC Golf: Golf Fest Returns To Oaks North On March 6th and 7th

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For the third straight year, Oaks North will be hosting Golf Fest, a two-day showcase of the latest equipment and a host of other golf-related products and services.

The event drew around 2,000 people last year and Oaks North Head Professional Lloyd Porter expects a strong turnout again. Golf Fest is on March 6 and 7 this year from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

“Both days, there’s a huge rush at 9 a.m.,” Porter says. “People are lined up all the way down the fairway. For a typical golfer, it’s exciting because you can see everything in one spot. There aren’t a lot of opportunities like that in Southern California.”

Golf Fest is an event for all ages and abilities. While adults sample products, juniors and beginners can play a six-hole loop for free, with a paid admission ($10 – children 10 and under are free. Parking is $5). Free lessons from a JC Golf pro are also available.

But the big draw is the new equipment, which is set up for testing on the driving range. This year’s vendor lineup includes Callaway, Cleveland/Srixon, Cobra, Ping TaylorMade, Tour Edge and Wilson.

Representatives from each company will be on hand to assist with testing and to answer product questions.

“You’re talking to the experts on every product,” Porter says. “And you’re actually on the driving range so you can see what’s going on.”

And equipment can be fit on site as well, meaning golfers can play their new equipment the same day. The North and East courses remain open for play during the event.

“We’re unique in that we keep the course open,” Porter says. “You can play golf and then enjoy the show.”

Around 70 vendors will be on site, providing everything from custom putters to range finders to massages.
Food (hamburgers, grill chicken sandwiches) and beverages (beer, soda) are also available as part of day that has a carnival-like atmosphere.

Other highlights include:

– A trick shot exhibition at 1 p.m. each day.

– A putting contest on the 9th hole of the South course.

– A hole-in-one contest on Saturday at 3 p.m.

– A goody bag provided by Golf Fest

And to make Golf Fest an even better value, paid admission includes a free future round of golf (Friday – Carmel Mountain Ranch; Sat. – Twin Oaks).

“You can’t lose,” Porter says.

To purchase advance tickets or learn more about the show, go to www.golffestshow.com.

JC Golf: Twins Oaks Introduces Golf and Grapes

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A golf teaching session begins with grabbing a club. Next week, it’ll also begin by grabbing a glass.

Twin Oaks Director of Instruction Paul Miernicki is combining golf education and wine education into a series called Golf and Grapes that will begin on Oct. 18th. The first session is called “Begin With the Basics” and will held on the Twin Oaks driving range and patio from 4-6:30 p.m., and attendance is being limited to 20 spots.

Miernicki says his inspiration for the concept came from a student of his in the wine industry. Miernicki saw it as a way for people to combine two passions that they would like to learn more about.

“I’m an entertainer,” Miernicki says, “and above all I want my students to have fun. So let’s drink some wine and have some fun.”

Miernicki says he’ll strive to combine golf and wine using common terms, such as short and sweet, which will be an introduction to the short game and sweet wines. Sommelier Dewey Lederer will be on hand to pour wines and providing tasting instruction. Each student will sample six wines.

The session costs $99. Golf attire is NOT required.

“We’re going to make wine tasting fun,” Miernicki says, “and combine it with the fun I normally have teaching golf.”

To register, go to www.jcgolf.com/golfandgrapes.

Buy 1 SLDR S Driver & Get a Fairway or Rescue Free! Ends November 6, 2014

Paul Miernicki

Photo courtesy of Southland Golf Magazine


Maderas: Maderas F & B Insider – Sous Chef Ryan Gilbert Talks About Oktoberfest

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Buy 1 SLDR S Driver & Get a Fairway or Rescue Free! Ends November 6, 2014

Maderas Golf Club members and guests will be treated to a unique seasonal feast on Wednesday, Oct. 8 when the club presents its Oktoberfest.

The event takes place from 5-8 p.m. and will feature German fare and entertainment along with tastings of German wine and beer from Karl Strauss.

In the following interview, Maderas sous chef Ryan Gilbert provides a preview of the menu and talks about what makes special events at Maderas special for members and staff.

What type of event is Oktoberfest?

It’s a fun-loving, outgoing atmosphere that allows people to relax and sample some different flavors of food and beers and enjoy what might be an out-of-the-box experience for them.

How did the staff plan the menu?

We took a look at what was successful last year and then added some new things. For instance, the pork schnitzel was a favorite last year, so we brought it back and decided to work with chicken. That’s the fun thing about these special events is that, as a staff, it allows us to explore some flavor profiles we don’t get into normally.

One of the menu highlights is a three-meat sausage platter – bratwurst, knockwurst and bockwurst. Can you please give us Sausage 101 for those who aren’t familiar?

The brat is the most common, and that’s a heavily spiced pork sausage. It’s a very clean-flavored sausage. The other two are variations.

Knockwurst a little creamier, a little lighter and more delicate.

Bockwurst is a little more on the spicy side.

The three sausages really play off each very nicely and complement each other very well. It’s three variations of flavors that are in the same ballpark.

And what would Oktoberfest be without beer … tell us about the beer.

We’re offering a limited-release season Oktoberfest from Karl Strauss. It’s a California thought process on German beers. It gives people who normally drink a pilsner or ale a chance to try a new micro beer.

And that continues a local theme that predominates the menu at Maderas. Can you talk about the local emphasis at Maderas?

The term macrobiotics refers to sourcing and using local products, from vegetables to meat. Being in such a lucky area in terms of food allows us to do this.

Our real goal is to provide an experience from regions around the world while focusing on what is trendy, sustainable and readily available from California, with Southern California being our main source.

We feature dishes that range from Mediterranean to Asian to Southern California’s Baja influence. What we’re trying to do is open people’s eyes to something new and something they may unfamiliar with by spreading out our menu.

How much fun is that for you as a chef to be able to work across that wide a culinary range?

For me, coming from a fine dining aspect, I try to bring a different thought process to the country club atmosphere. Maderas is extremely high-quality, high-end, probably more so than most golf clubs.

That gives us the opportunity to take things up a notch and surprise people by putting our California contemporary spin on things.

It challenges us to maintain a baseline, but also to explore new flavors, new ideas and new presentations that you might not see in most country-club environments.

I feel lucky to be at Maderas, where I can focus almost entirely on food and the dining experience. For a chef, that’s an amazingly rare position and a wonderful thing.

Buy 1 SLDR S Driver & Get a Fairway or Rescue Free! Ends November 6, 2014

October 2014 Southland Golf

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The October issue of Southland Golf was my busiest issue ever. Follow the link to the digital issue and you will find stories as listed.

The Grape Escape: Temecula wine country travel piece – page 9

Lasting Impact: Titleist 915 driver Q & A – page 24

Stick Around: A look at the Lodge at Torrey Pines – page 47

Bucket List: A lesson about lessons – tips for maximizing your golf lesson – page 57

Q & A W/Buffalo Bills Hall of Fame WR Andre Reed – page 86

Buy 1 SLDR S Driver & Get a Fairway or Rescue Free! Ends November 6, 2014

SD Day Trip: Temecula Wine Country

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My relationship with southern SoCal (meaning not LA) began in Temecula. That’s where I was hosted three years ago on what I like to call my new-life shopping trip.

Those are the three weeks I spent in SoCal planning the life I have now. Temecula wine country was a big part of those dreamy days. In particular, I had a couple social Sundays in the wineries meeting locals and gaining valuable advice on the plan for my new life.

But more than that, simply experiencing wine country sold me on SoCal. Where cornfields used to be my vista, now it was vineyards stretching endlessly into the horizon. Talk about a change of scenery.

My wine experience in the Midwest was mostly at the social functions I covered. I gained an appreciation for wine, but never a love. When I told that to people who moved to Omaha for the West Coast, I was assured I wasn’t drinking the good stuff.
Standing in a Temecula tasting room, swirling chardonnay in my glass, I knew this was the good stuff. And this was the good life.

In that respect, Temecula wine country will always be a special place because it helped me dream big dreams. Now it helps me realize them.

With every trip to wine country, my fascination grows as I learn more about the history and the people who gave birth to this magical place and soak in more of the culture and the ambience. Ah, the ambience.

This blog post hopes to capture a little of all the above, but, like the sips your wine card gets you, it’s only a taste of the Temecula experience, which amazingly continues to grow and evolve 40 years after Ely Callaway opened the first winery in 1974.

And fittingly our virtual tour begins at Callaway Winery. This is the recounting of my recent experience, but it’s only one. With nearly 50 wineries now, the ways to experience wine country are vast and growing every day. Not to be the Temecula Chamber of Commerce, but if you haven’t been, you need to go. It really is a magical place.

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One of the ways to experience wine country is via the Grapeline, a wine country shuttle service. Besides eliminating driving, the Grapeline provides a guided tour and plans your itinerary. Ours included stops at five wineries and lunch, which we’ll get to a minute. We were a band of 10, but the Grapeline can shut as many as groups of 30 or 40.

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Our tour began at Callaway with a wine tour, which is a tour of the winery that takes you through the process of wine making. Many of the wineries offer these and if you ask around, you’ll find out which are some of the better ones. As a far kid, I like to know where things come from so this is fascinating stuff for me. You learn what climates produce certain grapes, what the process is and then all sort of fun wine facts such as how many bottles of wine are in a barrel (300). I highly recommend a tour if you are a first-timer.

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About those grapes … We were told Temecula grows 24 varietals, nearly twice as many of most wine-making regions. Which means you really can experience it all here, and each winery has its own specialty or niche. That’s part of the joy of discovery of getting to know each one.

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This is the enterance to Callaway’s restaurant, but you can also see the vineyards in the background. Each property has a different make up. Some just make wine. Many have tasting rooms. Some have restaurants. Increasingly some have hotels. And many hosting weddings. Temecula is a very popular destination for that, and the wedding pics are phenomenal.

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The Callaway restaurant. How would you like that view for lunch? Stunning.

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You learn on the that roses serve as guardian plants for the grape vines. If there’s disease, it’ll show up on the roses first. Again, stuff like this speaks to my inner farm boy. These are the vines are Lorimar.

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What can you make out of wine corks? Temecula makes you realize seemingly infinite possibilities. And they repurpose wine barrels like crazy too. If you’re a huge home décor person, you’ll be in heaven here.

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This was lunch, staged in the barrel room of Cougar Vineyard and Winery. After a club sandwich, a fresh salad and a delicious brown with chocolate chunks inside, we were primed to continue tasting, which we, of course, also did with lunch.

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This is the view at Cougar. Like looking at the ocean, these views just never get old.

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Our last stop was at Temecula’s newest tasting room, Robert Renzoni Vineyards. This is a stunning property with a spacious tasting room and incredible views in every direction. I was a bit bummed we only had 30 minutes here. I wanted to stay and experience it much longer. Looks like I’m going back.

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The view at Renzoni. Tired of looking at these yet? I didn’t think so. Well, in the insert of blog brevity, I’m going to end the post here, but it could go on and on, and I re-do this post with different wineries and experiences every day for the rest of the experience. But this at least gives you a glimpse of what’s there to discover and do, especially at this time of year. Harvest is a festive time in wine country, and harvest started early this year due to the drought.
But if you’re planning in a trip in the next few months, know the wineries plan concerts and other events, such as grape stomping, around harvest. I have yet to experience that, but I want to this year.

And if I do, well, I expect to keep you “posted.” Cheers.