Tag Archives: Farmers Insurance Open

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Southland: North Course Renovation Finally On Tap For Torrey

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After three years of discussion and preparation, the North Course at Torrey Pines is finally having its date with a bulldozer in 2016.

The renovation is set to begin days after the Farmers Insurance Open and is slated to take six months to complete.

Tom Weiskopf, a PGA Tour veteran who had his first tour win at Torrey in 1968, and his design group are set to execute the redesign plan originally awarded to Phil Mickelson. City of San Diego Golf Operations Manager Mark Marney says the core concepts of the plan remain intact with only subtle differences in Weiskopf’s execution as opposed to Mickelson’s.

“There were core things we wanted to have and then it came down to what we could afford,” Marney said of a project that’s tabbed to between $12.6 million.

The core objectives are: Rebuilt, enlarged and re-contoured greens; new greenside and fairway bunkers; a cart path system; and a new irrigation and pumping system.

Players shouldn’t find the course tougher, Marney said, and some will find it more accessible.

“The course isn’t getting any longer, and we’re rebuilding a few tee boxes and adding an extra set of forward tees,” he said.

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Increases in difficulty and cost have been the primary concerns expressed by locals, some of whom play up to 150 rounds a year at Torrey. For them, the North is reprieve from the challenges of the tougher South Course, site of the 2008 and 2021 U.S. Opens.

“For a lot of them, it’d be pretty brutal to play the South all the time,” he said. “The North is a little more forgiving and we have players who prefer that.”

Marney said Torrey hasn’t raised its rates in five years and any future in case won’t be tied to the construction costs.

The North hosts between 80,000 and 85,000 a year – nearly 20,000 more than the South – and Marney said was long overdue for an update of the original William Bell design.

Amateur and professional players will benefit, Marney said, as the North is used during the first two days of the Farmers Insurance Open. During the tournament, the North on average plays three strokes easier than the South, a gap Marney said the new North course will be able to close if tournament officials choose.

“They’ll have an opportunity to pick some pin positions that will make it as tough as they want to make it,” he said. “But I’m not sure Tour players want us to close that gap. They like having the chance to go over to the North and shoot something lower and make hay when the sun shines.”

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As much of their play, Marney is look forward the Tour players’ reviews of the new North at the Farmers in 2017. Lots of dirt and sand will be moved between now and then – and possibly water. An El Nino winter could hamper construction, but Marney said delaying the project again wasn’t an option.

“Every time we delay, the construction costs increase. If we put it off again, the costs could’ve gone up another 10 percent,” he said. “Next year is uncertain too. We need to plan and be as ready as we can be.”

The project is scheduled to be done months before the 2017 Farmers. That’ll provide time for the course to round into shape, and sodding instead of seeding the greens is being done to expedite the conversion, Marney said.

“That’ll give us a finished green surface sooner but there are some risks involved,” he said. “We’ll have to put in extra work to make sure we don’t get a build up of organic material in the sodded greens, and we’ll have time to fix other construction scars.”

Overall, Marney said after years of delay, Torrey is finally poised to successfully give birth to a new North.

“We’ve got a good plan and a great designer and contractor who understand what we’re looking for,” he said. “I’m excited about the time a year when we’ll finally have the big unveiling.”

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Dec. Southland: Is El Nino The Perfect Storm For SoCal Golf?

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In the last week of October, almost exactly three months before the start of the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines, Paul Cushing had no trouble picking a tournament favorite: El Nino.

Cushing, the maintenance manager for the City of San Diego’s golf courses, in fact had already effectively doubled down on El Nino by buying extra pumps and other heavy duty water removal equipment in advance to handle the deluge that could come with the type of potentially extreme weather event an El Nino portends.

A historic hurricane in Mexico the previous week had only further convinced Cushing of the forecast of a wet winter for San Diego and Southern California. A warm Pacific Ocean mixed with late-summer heat and humidity had cooked up the proverbial perfect storm for a perhaps record-setting El Nino.

“At this point, I’d be much more surprised if we don’t have a significant rain event than we do,” Cushing said of tournament week (Jan. 28-31.).

Raining on the Tour’s annual parade through SoCal would put a damper on the professional season but likely be welcome news to the rest of the region’s golf course community, as long as extreme events, such as flooding and mudslides, don’t coincide.

Four years of drought have drained the reserves of the state and pushed courses to their liquid limit through water restrictions. The latest data, Cushing said, showed the state needing 75 inches of rain to recover.

“We’re not going to get that all back in one swoop,” he said, “but we could put a pretty good dent it, maybe at least get us through another year or two by restoring some of the ground reserves.”

Mike Huck, a water management consultant in San Juan Capistrano who monitors usage by the state’s courses, said California’s courses caught a break in 2015 between timely rains and late-arriving heat. Despite mandated water restrictions, courses kept their conditions up and in some cases saved more water than the mandate.

“The rain fall came with perfect timing,” Huck said. “Some courses had just started to go yellow after the cuts and it’s like they were given a breath of fresh air. Some courses you couldn’t even tell where the water had been shut off.

“I had one (Orange County) super tell me, ‘We’re as green as we’ve ever been.’”

But the superintendents are now ready for nature to really open the hose. And past experience and current conditions lead Huck to believe that relief is coming. Huck is more concerned with how the rains will come.

“How much will we capture?” he asks. “These storms can be really intense. If that’s the case, we won’t capture as much as if it was a nice, slow rain that drizzled for 10 days.”

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Like Cushing, Huck believes a best-case scenarios buys courses a couple years of supply and could even result in the lifting of water restrictions, which are due to be re-evaluated in the new year.

Or, Huck said, water boards could look at how courses got by on less in 2015 and stay conservative.

“It all depends on capture,” he said. “In the spring, they could say we’re comfortable with where we’re at, or they could press on restricting consumption.”

Huck said 2015 proved to be a huge learning year about conversation and resources for those in charge of course maintenance.

“Absolutely. It’s just like when we had the big drought in the late 70s. It really opened people’s eyes and made them take a different course and use less water. They realized you can maintain good course conditions with a lot less water.”

Huck would bet Southern California sees significant relief, but says there’s no guarantee Northern California would see the same. There can be regional differences, but Huck says the storms need to make an impact beyond the coast to really bail out California.

“What’s the snow pack is the big question,” he said, knowing the last two were the lowest in recorded California history. “Will the cold air mass come down to the Sierras or will it go to the Rockies? The experts seem split 50-50 about whether there will be a big snow event in the Sierras.”

Both ranges contribute to California’s supply and the snowmelt holds the potential for a more long-lasting impact than the storms themselves.

A worst-case scenario for courses, Huck said, is a winter that under delivers on El Nino’s potential. That downside is one Huck believes could be dire, not just drier, in 2016, meaning restrictions could increase.

“It could mean no water at all for some courses, or just water for tees and small percentage of greens,” he said.
The other downside is potential natural disaster conditions.

“Southern California could get flooding and mud slides. That could be almost as bad,” he said, noting courses that undertook turf reduction could be especially vulnerable to erosion.

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Art Miller, a 30-year Research Oceanographer in Climate Sciences at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography, said unprecedented ocean climate conditions make an extreme event more likely.

“The northern Pacific Ocean has (abnormally) warm ocean temperatures all the way up to Alaska,” he said. “Once it gets set up like that, it takes a long time to fade away.”

Miller said some models show it could take ocean temperatures as long as six months to normalize, which provides a longer window of opportunity for rain or severe weather beyond December to February, which is viewed as the peak window for El Nino.

Cushing has seen El Nino at its most destructive extreme. When the last one came in 2005, he was working on building Vellano Country Club in Chino Hills. The rains made the project work impossible until spring, when El Nino had subsided.

“We’d work and then get 10 inches of rain that would wash out the entire project,” he said. “We’d pick up the pieces and it would happen again. And we were a course with 600 feet of elevation change. Water was pooled everywhere.”

That El Nine brought a hefty 44 inches of rain to the region. That same soaking wouldn’t erase the drought but it’d certainly make a dramatic impact.

California’s reservoirs wouldn’t be overflowing, but its bunkers would be. That’s the scenario Cushing is already planning for.

Of his 2005 El Nino experience, Cushing said, “I think we’re in for that again.”

Southland: Meet Century Club CEO/President Peter Ripa

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The Century Club of San Diego, the nonprofit promotion arm for the PGA Tour’s Farmers Insurance at Torrey Pines, derives its name from the original donation amount asked of members.

When the club formed in 1961, members were asked to give $100, a gesture of support for their commitment to help raise funds for the fledgling tournament then known as the San Diego Open.

Just as the cost of membership has gone up – it’s now $1,250 – so has the significance, influence and impact of The Century Club.

In May, The Century Club announced that the tournament generated $3.1 donation to local charities. Century Club CEO and President Peter Ripa says awarding those donations is among the most meaningful parts of his job.

“We work with a lot of medium to smaller-sized charities,” Ripa says. “The numbers we are able to provide to them are meaningful, more so than they might be for some of the larger charities. For some of them, they’re able to do an entire summer program for kids that they otherwise couldn’t have done.”

For its overall contributions to the community, the San Diego Hall of Champions honored The Century Club with its 2015 Humanitarian Award in February. Ripa says the award had dual significance.

“The award is named after Ernie Wright, who started Pro Kids First Tee San Diego, which is one of our primary beneficiaries,” he says. “So it was ironic and special all at the same time.”

In his fourth year as CEO, the tournament has enjoyed the type of success Ripa envisioned when he took the job after serving in a similarity capacity for The Colonial, the PGA Tour’s stop in Fort Worth.

“I saw the opportunity of what this event represented. San Diego. Torrey Pines. Late January. I felt like I could sell that,” Ripa says with a wry smile.

Ripa coordinates the efforts of a group of 60 club members, the ones sporting the navy jackets at the tournament, and says the expectation of members is set from the outset.

“Our first-year members are provisional members,” he says. “Their duty is to provide warm introductions into relationships in the community, those businesses that value promoting San Diego, and let us help drive their business.”

Planning, promoting and especially improving the tournament experience are all year-round duties of The Century Club.

Ripa travels to industry events and at least six tour stops a year to glean ideas and foster relationships and partnerships. His overall emphasis has been to improve the fan experience, a primary example being the relocation of the entrance gate to near the Gliderport last year to improve efficiency of security and ticket checks.

“People were waiting 30 minutes to get in. They only way to improve that was to move the entrance. There wasn’t the opportunity in the old footprint,” he says. “We’re all fans. No one wants a 30-minute wait.
“We’ve now got the capacity, as more of our guests come through, to handle up to a 25 percent increase per year.”

Surveys showed the impact. Ticketholders and guests reported a 97 percent satisfaction rate, up from 96 the year before.

“It shows the incremental improvements from the investments. We’re working toward 100.”

Part of improving the fan experience is expanding it, Ripa says, through attention to concessions, the social experience, etc.

“What we’ve worked hard in promoting is that there’s more to experience than just the golf,” he says. “We’ve worked hard on the social areas to allow people to gather with friends and family and have a sandwich or a beer and enjoy a great day outdoors. We want them to realize the beauty of Torrey Pines and San Diego. It’s a world-class golf course.”

And as another world-class golf event – the 2021 U.S. Open – creeps closer, the Farmers, Torrey and San Diego will all benefit from the anticipation and exposure but will also be challenged to continue to provide a world-class experience.

One area getting lot of attention, Ripa says, is the rapidly expanding world of television, apps and online media and projecting what that will look like in 2021.

“The exposure for golf is growing, which will only benefit San Diego,” Ripa says. “In the end, it’s great for the players, the sponsors and the Tour as a whole, but it’s something you have to be prepared for. We want people from around the world to have access, and we’ll be ready.”

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FIO and AT & T Salute Military Service With Ultimate Fan Experience

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From left: JR Luna, Director of Retail Execution, AT&T Southwest & Hawaii; Anthony Jay Johnson, U.S. Navy Chief Petty Officer; Art Felix, Director of Sales, AT&T; and Loren Mansell, Business Operations Director, AT&T.

Story and photos courtesy of Gable PR

U.S. Navy Chief Petty Officer Anthony (Tony) Jay Johnson enjoyed the golf opportunity of a lifetime this year when he won a day at the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines with 19 of his friends and family, hosted by AT&T.

To recognize a service member or veteran who has served or is serving our country, AT&T and Farmers Insurance Open hosted a contest during January where all current and former members of the United States Armed Forces were encouraged to submit a “patriotic selfie” and/or brief description using #ATTSalutes of why they or someone else who has served or is serving deserved a day at the 2015 Farmers Insurance Open. Johnson was nominated by a friend and won the contest.

Johnson, a resident of Tierrasanta, recently moved to San Diego with his family to be stationed at Afloat Training Group, where he is responsible for checking on-ship systems and protocols. Johnson joined the Navy after graduating high school over 20 years ago and has been deployed seven times, mostly in the Arabian Gulf.

On Sunday, Feb. 8, Johnson attended the golf tournament with his wife, four children and other military members and retirees that he has befriended throughout his travels. The group was hosted in the Pacific Club, a semi-private venue on the 18th fairway, and treated to all-inclusive hospitality and phenomenal golf viewing valued at $6,000. AT&T executives also attended the event to celebrate with Johnson and thank him for his service.

In November 2013, AT&T announced that it was stepping up its veteran recruiting efforts with the goal of hiring 10,000 veterans and their family members into career opportunities over the next five years, consistent with its commitment to equal employment opportunities. In 2013, AT&T hired nearly five times as many veterans as compared to 2012.

JC Golf: Daniel Miernicki Endures A Tough Torrey Pines In Farmers Debut

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Daniel Miernicki with caddie Ben Itterman, left, and father Paul, the Director of Instruction at Twin Oaks.

Daniel Miernicki has played hundreds of rounds at Torrey Pines but never one like Thursday.

Under the spotlight of the PGA Tour and amidst course conditions akin to a U.S. Open, Miernicki made his Farmers Insurance Open debut. He had his moments but the South Course had a few more as it took four strokes from him after he shot even par through 11 holes. He finished with a four-over-par 76 heading into his second round on Friday on the easier North Course.

Miernicki, an All-American at the University of Oregon, Monday qualified with a 65 at El Camino Country Club and carried that momentum to the first hole Thursday. He blasted his opening drive 40 yards past his playing partners and then hit his approach into the green slope and watched it settle five feet below the hole. He converted for birdie for a stellar start to his round.

He gave that shot back when he missed the green right on the par 3 3rd and couldn’t get up and down. A birdie on the par 3 8th would be his only other birdie of the day.

Miernicki made back-to-back bogeys on Nos. 12 and 13, the toughest stretch of the course, to let shooting par slip away. He then had consecutive bogeys on Nos. 15 and 16. The rough in particular was thick and unforgiving as part of a course set up similar to last year, which many dubbed the toughest Farmers course ever.

Miernicki said the course conditions wore him down a bit.

“The course is really hard, and I struggled a little at the end. Maybe I got a little tired because it’s been such a long week. But it was fun,” he said.

“It was a good start, and I didn’t play that poorly. It was just a tough day. And it’s unlike playing any other event with all the people out.”

Miernicki had only one practice round prior to the tourney. That showed particularly, he said, on the greens.

“I struggled with the green speeds for sure,” he said, “and that’s something that’s just tough to prepare for.”

But Miernicki felt confident that going four- or five-under on the North on Friday would have him in contention to make the cut for the weekend.

“I feel good that I’ll have a chance to make up some strokes,” he said. “The North sets up better for me off the tee.”

Miernicki’s gallery included his father, Paul, the Director of Instruction at Twin Oaks. He called the day and week, overall, “as good as it gets.”

“I thought he was fabulous,” he said. “I couldn’t be more proud.”

FIO Course Report: “The Best Farmers Course Ever”

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A year ago, a mild winter made for ideal course conditions at Torrey Pines and allowed for a U.S. Open-like set up.

This year timely rains and mild weather again made for optimal conditions and have resulted in what City of San Diego Course Superintendent Paul Cushing says is “the best Farmers course ever.”

Cushing forecasted a winning score again in the single digits. A year ago, Scott Stallings shot a 68 on Sunday to score a one-shot victory at nine-under.

“The rain really helped with our rough. We have incredible rough. We’ve had to mow it twice already,” Cushing said.
“It’s just going to be great conditions out there this week.”

A few of the pros commented that it was the toughest Torrey set up they’ve seen. Tiger Woods, in particular, noted the green speeds.

“I was shocked at the green speeds,” he said after the Wed. pro-am. “They’re usually not set up this fast.”

Should make for another week of a tight leaderboard and possibly another horse-race Sunday finish.

Farmers Insurance Open 2015 In Photos: A Fan’s Guide

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It’s that week again … And this post provides some insights into what’s new, what you should know and what we noticed on a quick spin around the South Course Monday morning.

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I learned a lot about course maintenance and tournament set-up last year working with Torrey Superintendent Paul Cushing. The distinctive half-and-half stripe in the fairways lets you know it’s tournament time.

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As a fan, here’s the biggest thing to know logistically: The main entrance has moved to the Glider Port. The new entrance is greatly expanded and would seem to facilitate better crowd flow, but beware that the move was made for security purposes (bag checking, etc.). Factor that into your arrival time. And if you’re looking to follow someone on the North Course Thursday or Friday, bump your arrival time up by 30 minutes. You’ve got a hike ahead of you.

The first hole fans will see now is the par-3 11th on the South Course.

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Also new: The Fringe, a food and entertain pavilion sponsored by Harrah’s Resort SoCal around the 15th green on the South Course. Post-round concerts will take place Thurs./Fri./Sat. after play has cleared the 15th (roughly 3:30 p.m.) and last until sundown (5:15 p.m.). I love the addition of an after-hours vibe to the tourney. You can find the entertainment line-up here – www.farmersinsuranceopen.com/special-events/post-party-presented-by-harrahs-resort-socal/

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And the blog is officially intrigued by the La Jolla Burger. Do you get a t-shirt or plaque if you finish it? A half-pound burger on a golf course? Good thing there’s a lot of ground to walk it off.

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If you’re the collecting type, you can now get hats for the 2008 and 2021 U.S. Opens at the Torrey Pines pro shop. Pretty cool. The pro shop also seemed newly stocked with shirts and other gear. Always a must-see when you’re at Torrey.

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You’ll get an eyeful of Rickie Fowler on the grounds this week. He’s everywhere, but I thought this nod to his charity work was a nice tribute and touch. It’s great to see a Tour star using his profile this way.

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The par-3 16th on the South. Such a great view. The vistas inspire you again and again at Torrey.

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And naturally we end at the par 5 18th. What drama might unfold here this week? Can’t wait to find out.

Farmers 2014 Revisited: Studying Billy Horschel’s Practice Round

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Photo courtesy of www.zimbio.com.

Editor’s Note: The blog is still rebooting from the PGA Show. In the meantime, to prime you for the Farmers in two week at Torrey, here’s a re-post of a piece I did last year about Billy Horschel’s practice round. This piece spurred then-record traffic for my blog that week. Thankfully I’ve got many more followers now, so this is for those of you who may have missed this the first time.

On a day when the clouds refused to yield at Torrey Pines, Billy Horschel’s white golf ball dropped out of a gray sky and nearly into the cup on the South Course’s par-3 8th hole Tuesday.

Horschel’s tee shot to the front-right pin location caught a slope in the middle of the green and nestled back to within mere inches of an ace. On Thursday, Friday, Saturday or Sunday, it might’ve been an ESPN highlight. Today? As Allen Iverson famously once said, “This was practice, man. We’re talking about practice.”

His reward for near perfection after he walked to the green? He got to pick the ball up and go to work. A ball had been dropped in each bunker by his caddie and two more were hiding in the lush greenside rough, buried deeply like eggs left by an evil Easter Bunny.

Five balls in all and Horschel’s job was to drop each within 6 feet of the tournament’s four locations, three indicated by wooden pegs in the green.

Horschel worked through the shots, the toughest being a ball in the back bunker to a back pin, a tight shot to execute with about 5 feet of green to the hole.

Horschel’s sand shot floated out softly but didn’t land within the desired distance. Do it again, his caddy, Micah Fugitt, directed him.

“Oh, man, that was perfect,” Horschel said in a bit of mock protest. And then he hit another one that passed the test.

Hole after hole, this is how Horschel’s practice round went until he walked off the 18th green at about 2 p.m. Tuesday afternoon.

This was a PGA Tour pro at work on tournament week.

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Horschel hits bunker shots to multiple pin locations

If you follow the PGA Tour, you might remember Horschel for the octopus pants he wore for a round at the U.S. Open.

Locally, you’re possibly more likely to recall that he was in the final group of last year’s Farmers Insurance Open. Playing alongside eventual, and seemingly perpetual at Torrey, tournament champion Tiger Woods, Horschel couldn’t follow up his strong start and finished T-39.

Horschel, dressed in a pink shirt, white PING hat and white pats, was working hard Tuesday to prepare himself to better last year’s finish at a tournament that was his breakout a year ago.

“I still have good vibes about the place, for sure,” Horschel said. “There’s a learning curve out here and that was a learning experience.

“I’m looking forward to playing well the first two days and then playing better the last two days.”

To better his best finish at Torrey, Horschel spent his practice time Tuesday with a heavy emphasis on the short game, but with no neglect of anything.

His overall game certainly seemed sharp. He followed his near ace on No. 8 by bouncing his pitch shot into the pin on the par-5 No. 9 for a near eagle. The reward? Two more pitches to alternative pin locations and more work on the green – by Billy and his caddie.

While Horschel worked, Fugitt hand-rolled multiple balls to one peg and studied the break.

Two holes later, Fugitt switched to being videographer. On the long par-3 11th, as Horschel teed off with an iron, Fugitt stood behind him taking video with a cell phone camera. Horschel’s shot came up short right of the front pin location.

Horschel studied the video for about 45 seconds and re-teed. Similar result.

“Too high,” Horschel self-analyzed as he walked off the tee.

At the green, the short-game game began all over again with him hitting chips, bunker shots and putts to various locations.

After watching a putt to a back pin location veer wide, Horschel asked his caddie, “Didn’t I three-putt here last year?”

His caddie confirmed and Horschel dropped more balls.

On 12, the tough par-4 played toward the ocean, Horschel spent more time testing the Torrey rough, which was ankle-deep and thick. After Horschel’s club hit the rough with a grassy thud his swings produced divots the size of small house plants.

Trying to hit a flop from a particularly tough patch, Horschel’s flop flailed meekly and promptly returned to the rough prompting him to self-scold, “Geez, Billy.”

He hit four or five more from that spot.

The desired short-game goal always seemed to be six feet, but Horschel wouldn’t be that specific when asked later.

“The closer you get to the hole, the better your chance on the putt,” he said. “If you average getting it within 6 feet on your short-game shots, you’ve got a pretty good chance of getting up and down.

“Everyone has their way of practice and mine is to spend more time on my short game. It’s just a little game we play.”

On 13, a par-5 played with two split tee boxes, Horschel found the middle of the fairway with his drive and then tried to get home in two to a green fronted by tiered bunkers.

His first attempt slammed into the wall of the front left bunker; his next did the same on the right.

After taking a minute to recalibrate, Horschel fired a 3-wood that cleared easily and bounded onto the green.

“That was a solid,” Horschel said while handing his club to Fugitt. It was the closest he came to an audible self-compliment all day.

After he walked off the 18th green, I asked about his practice routine and the amount of time, especially, he spent playing out of the rough.

“The rough is thick. You know you’re going to miss some greens, unfortunately, so I needed to find out how the ball was going to react. Getting up-and-down can save you a lot of shots,” he said.

Starting Thursday, we’ll find out if Horschel’s practice saves him enough.

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SD Tourism: The Farmers Returns to Torrey in February, Adds Concerts

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This post is part of an occasional series for the San Diego Tourism Authority.

The PGA Tour’s annual spotlight on San Diego will shine again on Feb. 5-8, 2015, at the Farmers Insurance Open at scenic Torrey Pines.

Held in San Diego and at Torrey since 1952, the PGA’s annual stop is part of the Tour’s West Coast swing. The tournament falls between the Waste Management Phoenix Open in Scottsdale and the AT &T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am in Pebble Beach.

Highlights of the Torrey tourney: warm weather, a world-class course and the regular presence of such Tour stars as Phil Mickelson and Tiger Woods. Woods is a seven-time winner of the event besides being the winner of the iconic 2008 U.S. Open at Torrey Pines.

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Turf and Surf: Saturday photos from Torrey and Cardiff

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Photo courtesy of Kimberly Burditt

Just wanted to post a few shots from the day and the drive home. Stopped in Cardiff after the tournament at Torrey and got the shots below of big waves rolling in before sunset.

The above pic is the scene around the 5th green today, where Jordan Spieth hit his approach long and left of the green, had to take relief from a cart path and ended up taking double bogey. To his credit, he overcome a tough start and remains the story of the tourney – you know, if you don’t count Phil and Tiger being out of it.

I’m intrigued by Spieth and followed him for half his round today. I’m going back tomm. and we’ll see if he can really grab the golf world’s attention by finishing what he started. Should be fun.

See you at Torrey.

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