Tag Archives: Mark Hayden

Big News: SoCal PGA Honors Blog W/2014 Media Award

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Here’s a great way to start a week: Announcing you won something.

I was informed last week that I’ve been chosen as the 2014 Media Person of the Year by the Southern California PGA’s San Diego Chapter. It’s obviously gratifying and always an honor to win something like this, but I’m particularly appreciative of this award since I’m living in a new area and it comes from a group of people (the PGA pros) that I respect and really enjoy working with.

In particular, I have Mark Hayden, General Manager of Eagle Crest and member of the PGA board, to thank for this. He’s been a supporter of mine from the beginning and nominated me back when I didn’t even there was something to be nominated for.

Anyway, this is the endorsement Mark wrote for my LinkedIn after nominating me:

“I have had the pleasure of knowing Corey Ross for over three years now, beginning with him being a student in my class at the Golf Academy of America. The enthusiasm and passion he showed for the game then he now expresses in his writings.

“His regular blog posts and magazine articles have been a great a promoter of the Southern California golf experience, as well as promoting the SDPGA, Junior Golf, PGA professionals and the game as a whole. He work has been well received in the golfing community.

“That’s why, though he’s only been doing this in San Diego for barely more than year, I felt he was worthy of nomination as the SDPGA’s 2014 Media Person of the Year. This annual award given by the SDPGA and its more than 400 members recognizes the media person who contributes the most to golf in the greater San Diego area. This honor can only be awarded to someone who has shown dedication to promoting the game and who has many supporting contributions, but Corey’s work has quickly met this criteria as his professionalism has earned him an impressive roster of golf clients, including TaylorMade Golf, JC Golf and Maderas Golf Club.

“I wish him well in future endeavors and know he’ll continue to diligently and creatively work to spread the word about the golfing good life we all enjoy in Southern California.”

There really isn’t any more that I could want someone to say about my work than that. There are plenty of others who’ve been supportive along the way, but I’d be quite remiss if I didn’t mention my editor at Southland Golf, Al Petersen, who gave the first assignment that got the ball rolling on all of this and gave me my new professional life in California.

Then I started the blog and started blogging for JC Golf and 160-some posts later socalgolfblog.com is now award-winning. I’d like to thank all my clients, but in particular Maderas General Manager Bill O’Brien who had a hand in pointing me in the right direction from the beginning in terms of marketing needs for golf courses. His openness, honesty and friendship have been invaluable while I’ve been figuring out a direction for my work.

I’m hopeful that other courses and course groups will see the content need the way JC Golf and Maderas do and that I can help more of them promote the incredible playing experiences Southern California golf has to offer.

Beyond that, I hope my readers have similarly appreciated what they find here. It’s been fun to watch the readership grow and I hope for only more of the same in 2015.

Finally, thank you to the Southern California PGA members and board for validating all the work that has been done here. I’m looking forward to meeting as many of you possible at the awards breakfast in December. Thank you for the honor.


July 2014 Southland Golf

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www.southlandgolfmagazine.com

Eagle Crest course review, Page 16

Front Nine Golf Leaders Profiles

Harry Arnett cover story and profile, Page 28

Mike Flanagan profile, Page 31

Susan Roll profile, Page 35

A Little Piece of Personal Publishing History

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This is the latest cover of Southland Golf, which scored me my first cover story out here, a feature on Callaway Golf Marketing VP Harry Arnett. I’ll get the articles and links posted at the end of the week when the digital issue will hopefully be available.

I started writing for Southland Golf a year ago and this was favorite issue yet for several reasons. I got to work with two of my former mentors at the Golf Academy (Senior Instructor Mike Flanagan and Mark Hayden, now the GM at Eagle Crest) and make two new connections (Harry and Susan Roll of the Carlsbad Golf Center) I’d been wanting to make for a while. 

Hope you enjoy the issue.

Highlight Hole: No. 12 at Eagle Crest

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Photo courtesy of Eagle Crest General Manager Mark Hayden

If you’ve played Eagle Crest Golf Club in Escondido in the past but haven’t been in a while, you’ll notice some changes when you return.

Since coming under new management late last year, Eagle Crest has embarked on some course-improvement projects, mostly involving reworking tee boxes and bunkers.

To date, the most significant change you’ll notice is around the green on the par-5 12th.  What used to be a sizable and steep sand trap on the left has been converted into a water hazard, returning the hole to its original design.

From a playing perspective, it raises the risk when thinking about going for this green in two on a hole that plays to 529 yards from the blues and 514 from the whites.

Granted to do that, you’ll have to get off the tee box in decent shape first, which is a stumbling block for many.

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Tee shot on 12

From the blues, the tee shot looks narrower than it actually is. That said, your best bet is to favor the left side as the right side of this fairway is tree-lined and mounded. You’ll either likely have an uneven lie or be hitting a knockdown if you end up there.

The second advantage of the left side is that it’s bowled a bit to keep errant tee shots in. I used that to my advantage on Sunday and was sitting about 260 out. That’s not ideal “go” range here especially when hazards lurk left (water) and right (traps) and there’s plenty of room to lay up short to a green with a very narrow opening.

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The look on your second – notice you can’t see the water on the left yet

I hit a rescue to within about 90 yards and then had no trouble hitting wedge to the back of the green and making par.

This hole comes in the middle of a very score-able stretch of the golf course, being preceded by a short elevated par-3 and being followed by a short par-4.

When deciding how much you want to push it on No. 12, you’ve got something new to consider that’s more penal than before.

I’m guessing the course’s flock of wood ducks will like the hole’s new design more than you will if you miss left.