Tag Archives: Reidy Creek

JC Golf: Take The Par 3 Challenge For a Chance to Win Three Years of Free Golf

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Your prowess on the par 3s at the Reidy Creek executive course in Escondido could pay off in a big way In April.

At 10 a.m. on Masters Saturday, April 11th, a group of lucky golfers will tee it up on the par 3 18th at Reidy Creek for a chance to win up to three years of free golf.

A hole-in-one in the finals of the Reidy Creek Par 3 Challenge will win three years of free golf at Reidy Creek from JC Golf. A closest to the pin that doesn’t hole out will still be awarded one year of free golf.

Spots in the finals are earned through three qualifiers that are taking place in March. The next one is Friday, March 20, at 3 p.m. The final opportunity is Sunday, March 29, at 9 a.m. Admission to each qualifier is $35.

In the qualifiers, players play their normal 18-hole round and simply mark their tee shots as they would in a closest to the pin at a charity event. Each closest to the pin flag won earns one shot at No. 18 in the finale.

On the day off the finale, each winner will take their earned chances at No. 18 for a shot at the big prize. That hole will be a fitting place to spend Saturday during the Masters. The hole has a feel of Amen Corner, with a green sounded by water and accessed via a stone bridge.

Also on the day of the finals, bbq will served and a beer tasting will take place for participants, who are invited to stay and watch The Masters.

For information about the event, call 760.740.2450.

For more information about the course, see my overview of the Reidy Creek playing experience: http://socalgolfblog.com/2014/05/04/jc-golf-five-reasons-to-play-reidy-creek/

San Diego Tourism: SD’s Five Best Courses for Kids

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Left: Oaks North. Right: Reidy Creek.

This post is part of an occasional series for the San Diego Tourism Authority. You can find this post on their site at http://www.sandiego.org/articles/golf/5-kid-friendly-golf-courses.aspx

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Golf is a game for all ages, but it’s now more kid-friendly than ever in San Diego thanks to a new way to play the game.

In late summer of 2014, two courses in San Diego installed 15-inch cups, making the hole about the size of a large pizza, as a part of TaylorMade Golf initiative termed “Hack Golf” designed to draw new players to the game by making scoring easier.

Oaks North in Rancho Bernardo and Lomas St. Fe, both executive courses, were among the first adapters. Oaks North dedicated its nine-hole east course to the new game while Lomas St. Fe committed all 18 holes, hosting a 15-inch cup and a regulation hole on each green.

The new game has especially been a hit with kids, juniors and couples, say course managers in the area.

“The holes are here to stay,” says Lloyd Porter, Head Professional at Oaks North. “This is for the next generation of golfers.”
Players on the “hack” courses also get the benefit of forward tees.

The following list of top courses for kids in San Diego starts with those two courses and includes others known for being particularly hospitable to kids, juniors and beginners.

1. Lomas Santa Fe Executive Course – Course architect William Bell is best known for designing Torrey Pines, but he also built this 2,431-yard gem in Solona Beach. Lomas has been named one of America’s “Top Short Courses” by Golf Range Magazine the past two years and consists of all par 3s, save two 4s, and has an ocean view from the eighth tee box. Lomas is also the only course in the county currently offering the 15-inch cups on 18 holes. The holes are all placed in the backs of the greens so as not to be obtrusive to regulation play. Lomas also offers Glow Ball night golf on a semi-monthly basis, giving beginners, kids and juniors another way to enjoy the game.

2. Oaks North – Nine of Oaks North’s 27 holes are set up for “hack” rounds, but all three executive nines are terrific for beginners.

The east course hosts the 15-inch cups, but even played with the forward tees, the new game hardly reduces the course to pitch and putt. Three of the tee shots are more than 200 yards, giving younger players ample room to swing away and hit clubs all the way through their bag.

The 15-inch holes are donated by flags with the number “15” and orange balls with the same number on the tee boxes.

JC Golf originally had an introductory offer of nine holes for $15 for the east course (cart not included), but visitors will find all three nines affordable, playable and walkable and the practice facility, which includes a 15-inch cup as well, a great place to learn and be taught.

3. St. Mark Golf Club/Lake San Marcos – These two courses in San Marcos are a doubly good destination for kids because they pair a playable regulation course (St. Mark’s) and an executive course in the same community complex.
St. Mark’s hosts a number of junior tournament. Its largely flat topography and manageable yardage (6,398 yards/par 71) make it ideal for juniors and beginners, though a long par-5 on the back and a severely elevated par-4 on the back provide a test.
Lake San Marcos’ recent renovation included new cart paths, but the course is plenty walkable and a pleasurable stroll while honing your iron and short-game play. A new clubhouse is also in the works.

4. Reidy Creek – Even if you’ve experienced a number of executive courses, chances are you haven’t played one like Reidy Creek in Escondido.
Two things in particular make Reidy Creek unique: the setting and its sophisticated greens.
The course winds through a wooded area in the shadow of the Escondido mountains, making it more like a miniature version of a regulation course than what people largely associate with executive courses.
Sometimes-severe bunkering and heavily sloping greens make scoring a challenging even though the course is played entirely with irons.
Reidy Creek is an aesthetically enjoyable and challenging way to learn the game.

5. Mission Bay – Located just minutes from downtown, Mission Bay is an executive course owned and run by the City of San Diego.
Speaking of setting, how do ocean breezes and night lighting work for you? You can enjoy both on this par 58 that includes four par 4s.
Unlike some executive courses, Mission Bay also has a driving range.
And if you like a little history with your golf, Tiger Woods won a Junior World title here once.

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JC Golf: Five Reasons to Play Reidy Creek

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If you haven’t yet discovered Reidy Creek, an executive course at the base of the Escondido Mountains, you might be surprised at what you find.

It’s easy to say this isn’t what you’d expect from an executive course. It’s another thing to show you.

Take the third hole. It plays to 167 yards nearly dead uphill with two deep sand traps guarding the right side. There’s room short and left, but long is OB. The green is double-tiered, not counting the false front. It took a healthy 6-iron for me to find the back fringe.

It’s no stretch to envision this being a par-3 on the course you play regularly. And that’s what Reidy largely feels like – a real golf course at an reduced yardage (2,582). It’s more like a second-shot course, if you will, because the greens are what you’d expect to find at the end of a regulation par-4 or -5.

Take that level of play and put it without terrain that winds through the wilderness of a wooded area (trees, streams, wildlife, etc.) and you’ve got an uncommon executive golf experience. Note: If you aren’t hitting it reasonably straight, you will lose balls here.

I played Reidy for the third time last week, first in a while, and was glad to be reminded of its merits. I came away with at least five things I really like about this course.

Sophisticated greens – The normal association you get for greens at an executive course is small and mostly flat. Not here.

Every green at Reidy is undulating and some are quite large (there’s a double green on back nine) meaning they can host multiple pin positions and really change how the course can play.

Some pin positions can be quite tough. For instance, I hit a shot to 6 feet early in round that ended up being a 15-foot putt. My ball landed on the wrong side of a ridge.

And that’s part of what keeps this course challenging for advanced players. If you go pin-seeking every hole, I guarantee you’ll eventually have to hit a major recovery shot at some point. For me, it was a bunker shot from an awkward stance.

The other benefit of these types of greens is that if you aren’t good at reading greens, this is an ideal place to learn. And the green speeds are kept at a pace that doesn’t penalize you terribly for your misses.

To show you what kind of putts you can get, I was really wanting a birdie to get my card back to 1-over going into No. 18. That meant sinking a 12-footer on 17. The putt had 6 feet of break and I just missed, grazing the cup. Not a putt you normally find an executive course, but great practice for my next regulation round.

You will earn your score here, trust me.

Walkability/pace – My only reservation about walking here is simply a few long, but manageable, stretches between holes. But I saw people walking who told me they didn’t mind.

The Reidy staff told me about a third of players walk or take a pull cart. Either way, playing in under three hours is certainly doable and a refreshing break from the plodding pace you find on some bigger courses.

I zipped around in about 2:30, playing through about three groups in the early afternoon. It found my rhythm on the back and scored well.

You can play fast here, or take time to teach, which I’ll get into in a few more paragraphs.

Great condition – Save for some maintenance on the tee boxes this time, this course has been in peak shape each time I’ve played it. And the greens are tip top.

You don’t have to worry about spotty greens or finding a course that’s rough around the edges here. You get the same quality you’d expect at every other JC course.

 Great couple’s course – It’s common to see couples here, and for good reason. It’s a course that can easily accommodate differing handicaps.

From my own experience, I brought a former girlfriend here who was getting back into the game.  She found the whites tees comfortable and the course quite playable. On the back nine, after a few near-misses, she finally bagged her first birdie on No. 16 and did a victory dance around the flagstick.

That success came after a little coaching and a little practice, which the pace here allows for.

Meanwhile, I was getting some solid practice in on my irons and my short game.

The only possible drawback here is that you don’t get to hit driver, which I know some players like to do at least once or twice on an exec., but you don’t really miss it. The level of shot making required keeps it interesting enough.

No. 18 – Try to think of a finishing hole at an executive course you’ve played. Can you?

You’ll remember the 18th at Reidy Creek, partly because it gives you your first impression of the course.

When you pass the pro shop, the first thing you see is the pond surrounding the 18th green and the stone walking bridge leading to it. It’s an eye-catcher and evokes a little Amen Corner association the first time you see it.

Playing it is a challenge. It’s 164 yards to a deep green, which, again, is surrounded by water on the right and OB left. What’s more, factor in a slight crosswind.

When I played it, I pushed a little too hard for birdie and yanked my tee shot OB. There’s a rather safe play available to the front of the green, but then you’ve got a lot of putt on your hands.

I took double bogey and walked off in 3-over on the back. I’m coming back to par it. Hey, didn’t I say that last time?

To book a round at Reidy Creek, call 760.740.2450 or book it here at jcgolf.com.